Struve 2804
John Ryan
Star: Struve 2804
Date & Time: 4 Sept. 2001 ( 21:15 UT)
Seeing: 4+ <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)>
Location of site: Barreras, Salamanca, Spain.
Site classification: Rural, Suburban.
Conditions: almost full moon, fairly dry but with gusts of wind.
Sky darkness: 3+ <Limiting magnitude> due to moon.
Telescope: TeleVue 101 on a Alt Az Gibraltar mount
Eyepieces: 6mm Radian
Magnification: 90X
Harshaw Scale: 1 <1-5; 1 best>
Clean split at 80X with thin black line between the two components. 
Close double but more so with the bad seeing. Nice color contrast of yellow-gold and blue.

I thougt this was the nicest doble of the night

 


 
Richard Harshaw 
Star: Struve 2804
Date & Time: September 5, 2001,
0230 to 0510 UT
Seeing: 6 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)>
Transparncy: 6 to 7 (variable, due to high hazy clouds) <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)>
Location of site: Northern Kansas City,
Missouri (USA). 39º15' N, 94º30'W
980 ft above Mean Sea Level
Site classification: suburban 
Sky darkness: -- <Limiting magnitude>
Telescope: Celestron C-8m C-11
Magnification: 112x, 311x
Harshaw Scale: 2 <1-5; 1 best>
HD Number 205160
ADS 15076
Position:  2133+2042  Rating:  2
Components:
 A:  7m, F6 IV
 B:  8.3m, F8, 3.3 +” @ 355 + 
 C:  11.6m, 97” @ 106 
Year of last AB Measure:  1991
Distance (l.y.): 177, Luminosity (Suns): 5.2
Observed colors:  O, B, ?

Observations: Observed at 311x.  AB was split at 112x, but better at 311.  At 311, AB looked like the eyese of a spook!  At this power with the C11, the colors looked more like yW, yW, and W.  Nice pair.
A neat little "Delphinus" lies just to the E of this double and shows up best at 311.
"Very beautiful," wrote Webb.

Notes: First measure 2.9" @ 317.  1905 (Burnham), PA of 236.
The stars share common proper motion.
 
 

 


 
Stuart Clough
Star: Struve 2804
Date & Time: 8th September 2001. 2030 UT
Seeing: 3-4 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)>
Location of site: Near Halifax West Yorkshire, England.
Site classification: Suburban
Conditions: Clear sky, fresh NNW'ly breeze
Temperature: 8C 
Sky darkness: 4.8 <Limiting magnitude>
Telescope: Orion Optics UK GX250 10"  f4.8 Newtonian on Vixen GP mount.
Eyepieces: 9mm Ortho.
Magnification: x133.
An attractive double, split beautifully at x133, colours yellow and deep yellow. The flux difference seemed less than the published 0.7 magnitudes.

There is an attractive asterism of 12th magnitude stars in the field some 2 arc minutes Eastward.
 

 


 
William Schart
Star: Struve 2804
Date & Time: 9/29/01
from 8:12 to 9:15 pm CDT
Seeing: 6 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)>
Transparncy:  <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)>
Location of site: Killeen, TX, USA
Site classification: Suburban
Sky darkness: 3.5 <Limiting magnitude>
Telescope: Celestron C8
Magnification: 80x, 160x (CMG), 200x
At first I thought that I could not split this pair, then I realized I had gone to the wrong declination. Once at the right coordinates, I was able to cleanly split the pair at low power. They appeared to be blue.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 


 
Jim Phillips
Star: Struve 2804
Date & Time: Oct. 8, 2001
Seeing: 6-7 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)>
Transparency: 6 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)>
Location of site: Hodges, South Carolina, USA
Site classification: Suburban
Sky darkness:  <Limiting magnitude>
Temperature: 45ºF
Telescope: Astrphysics 155 F/7 Apo
Magnification: 181x
Beautiful near equal white pair. Very nice.
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
Dave Moore 
Star: Struve 2804
Date & Time: 21st October 2001
19.55-22.00 BST 
Seeing: 3 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)>
Transparency: 7 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)>
Location of site: Charminster, Bournemouth, Dorset
51ºN, 1ºW
Site classification: Suburban
Sky darkness: 4.3 <Limiting magnitude>
Moon: 4 Days Old, but below horizon
Bootle Scale: 8 (Suburban/Urban)
Telescope: 8" Meade LX-90 SCT f/10 (Lucy)
Eyepieces: 30mm Celestron Ultima (67x), 
26mm Meade Super Plossl (77x), 
12.5mm Celestron Ultima (160x), 
2x Barlow
Magnification used: 67x, 160x
         
Just split at 67x, this is comfortable at 160x. The two stars involved are of roughly even brightness, with the slightly brighter star white and it's companion blue-white.