52 Orionis 

Craig M. Carver
Star: 52 Orionis 
Date & Time:  11/24/98  0700 UT 
Seeing:  6-7 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)> 
Location of site: Madison, WI (Lat 43.07, Long 89.38, Elev. 500 ft) 
Site classification: Suburban 
Sky darkness: 4.8-5.0  <Limiting magnitude> 
Telescope: 6" Maksutov 
Magnification: 95x, 190x, 257x 
This is a difficult split for my 6" at this site.  The difference in magnitudes of the pair (6.0 and 9.5) also make it difficult.  I could see an elongation or bulge where the secondary would be at 257x, but no split or darkness between them. 

 
Paolo Morini
Star: 52 Orionis 
Date & Time: 07 Dec 1998, approx 23 UTC 
Seeing:  8 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)> 
Location of site: San Romualdo, a little village in the country near Ravenna – Italy. 
Site classification: Suburban 
Sky darkness: 5  <Limiting magnitude> 
Telescope: Takahashi FS102 
Magnification: 164x (LE5 eyepiece) – 205x (LV4 eyepiece)  – 328 x (LV 2.5 eyepiece)
At 328x the star is split and the separation correspond to the limit of the instrument. At lesser magnification the duplicity is not visible. 

Honestly I didn’t see clearly a back space between the stars, but the elongated shape (two disks touching each other) was very evident. My friend saw the black channel clearly, I was not so sure (the image is dark at this magnification and there were cars passing on the near road with strong disturbing lights). I’ll try again to split better this star. 

 


 
Dominik Elsässer
Star: 52 Orionis 
Date, Time: 28 Dec 1998, 00:17-01:08 UT 
Limiting Magnitude (NE): ~4.5 (moonlight!) 
Seeing: 8-9; improving [1-10] 
Location: Kleinkahl, Germany 
Site classification: Rural 
Telescope: Vixen 102M Refractor 
Magnification: 250x (Celestron Ortho) 

Star: 52 Orionis 
Date: 05.01.99, 21.12-22.05 UT 
Seeing: 9 
Sky Darkness: 4.3 (moonlight) 
Location: Kleinkahl, Germany 
Site Classification: Rural 
Telescope: Vixen 102M 
Magnification: 320x 

Comments: Star appears clearly elongated with two centers during most of the observation period. In moments of really steady seeing the pair apparently begins to split! Under perfect conditions I suppose this star can be split completely with this telescope. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

I finally saw two round Airy-Disks with the smallest possible amount of black space between them; the colour of the stars was a slight yellow. This seems to be the resolution-limit of the Vixen 102M. 
 


 
William L. Schart
Star: 52 Orionis 
Date & Time:  1/6/99 8:55 pm CST 
Seeing:  8 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)> 
Location of site: Killeen, TX (Lat 31 N, Elev 600 ft) 
Site classification: Suburban 
Sky darkness: 4 <Limiting magnitude> 
Telescope: Orion 6" Dob. 
Magnification: 98x 

Star: 52 Orionis 
Date & Time: 1/11/99 10:07 pm CST 
Seeing:  7 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)> 
Location of site: Killeen, TX (Lat 31 N, Elev 600 ft) 
Site classification: Suburban 
Sky darkness: 4 <Limiting magnitude> 
Telescope: Orion 6" Dob. 
Magnification: 240x 
 
Star: 52 Orionis 
Date & Time: 12/9/99, 10:28 pm CST 
Seeing: 8 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)> 
Location of site: Killeen, TX, USA 
Site classification: (suburban) 
Sky darkness: mag 4 
Telescope: Orion 6" Dob 
Magnification: 32x, 48x, 72x, 120x 

Star: 52 Orionis 
Date & Time:  December 28, 2000 9:39 pm CST 
Seeing: 8 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)> 
Location of site: Killeen, TX, USA 
Site classification: (suburban) 
Sky darkness: mag 4 
Telescope: Orion 6" Dob 
Magnification: 32x, 48x, 72x, 120x, 144x, 240X 

Located by star hopping from Alpha Ori. Easily identified as it the brightest star in the neighborhood. However I was unable to split at any power currently available to me. I will try again later when the barlow I have on order arrives. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Continuing observations for the 33 doubles in Orion project, I re-visited this star to see if I could split it with the aid of my newly arrived barlow. I did possibly detect a very extremely faint companion at aproximately PA 180. It was too faint for any kind of measurement. 
 
 
 
 
 

I was able to split this at 120x, not at all at lower powers. The secondary is extremely faint, at the limits of my visibility. I estimate the separation at about 1", 
but it was too faint for me to actually measure. 
 
 
 
 
 

I suspected at least elongation at 144x and confirmed split at 240x. Both appeared W and a rough estimate of the PA is 60°. 

 


 
Chuck Layton
Star: 52 Orionis 
Date of Observation:  Jan. 11, 1999 
Time of Observation:  06:45 UT 
Seeing (1 - 10, 10 best):  5 
Site classification: Suburban 
Limiting Mag. (naked eye):  4.8 
Instrument Used:  20cm f/6 Eq. Newtonian 
Magnifications Used:  271X 
Observed Colorations of Components:  Both components appear yellowish white. 
Other comments:  Very close pair of identical yellowish stars.  Beautiful.  Clean split. 
 

 
Dave Mitsky
Star: 52 Orionis 
Date & Time: 1/27/99  06:12 UT 
Seeing: 6 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)>.
Transparency: ~ 6 
Location of site: ASH Naylor Observatory (http://www.msd.org/obs.htm) 
near Lewisberry, PA 
Site classification: Rural 
Sky darkness: < 5.0 <Limiting magnitude> moonlight 
Telescope: 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain 
Magnification: 118x, 202x, 259x 
This close (1.2") binary was occasionally split with difficulty at 202x and was a close split at 259x.  No obvious color was noted. 
 

 
Orlon Petterson, Marilyn Head, Giles Reid and David Downing 
Star: 52 Orionis 
Date & Time: 13/02/99, 10:00UT to 14:00 UT 
Seeing: 7-8 got better as night progressed 
Location:  Staveley, ~80km SW of Christchurch, New Zealand. 
Instrument: 102mm f/9.8 refractor 
Sky darkness: 6 - 6.5  <Limiting magnitude> Again didn't actually make a definitive measure but the sky was dark and the transparency really good. 
Magnification: 208x 
This was the last one I tried for.  Took a while to locate it with positive identification taking a while, unfortunately after all that effort and Orion low in the sky it appeared annoyingly to be just a point source all alone in the night.  I'll be back to check this one out again! 
 

 
Ilario Melandri
Star: 52 Orionis 
Date & Time: 6/Dec/1999 – 19.16 UTC 
Seeing: 5 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)> 
Location of site: Italy, Ravenna, San Romualdo, Lat 44 32’N Lon 12 08’E
Elevation: 0 m
Site classification: Rural 
Sky darkness: 5.5  <Limiting magnitude>
Temperature: -0.5C 
Telescope: 150 mm f/15 achromatic refractor 
Magnification: 250x (Othoscopic eyepiece 9 mm)


 

 
Richard Harshaw
Star: 52 Orionis [STF 795; ADS 4390; SAO 113150] 
Location of site: Northern Kansas City, Missouri (USA) 
94d 30m west longitude, 39d 15m north latitude 
980 ft above Mean Sea Level 
Date of observations (UT): 0455 on 12/31/99 
Site classification: suburban 
Sky conditions
seeing-- 6 out of 10 
transparency-- 8 out of 10 
limiting visual magnitude-- 5 
Temperature: 36 F 
Telescope: Celestron C-8 
Eyepiece: 7.4mm w/ 2.48x Barlow (670x) 
 
This pair is too close to measure with my illuminated reticule Micro-Guide so I can only report visual impressions. 

I suspected duplicity at 200x, but easily split the pair at 670x. I found that an objective diffraction mask helped a great deal as it broke up the two stars's Airy disks into 6-spoked patterns, and by 
rotating the mask, I could get the spokes to bracket the stars, letting them pop out from the glare in a most remarkable way. 

This is a beautiful pair, consisting of two even lily-white specks with the crispest isthmus of black sky between them! 

Hipparcos data suggests a distance of 480 light years, implying a total luminosity of 132 Suns. 
Star A is a spectroscopic binary and rotates at 110 kps. 

Measurements from 1990: 
6.1m (A5V) primary 
6.1m (F0V) companion, 1.6" at PA 212 (increasing) 
 


 
Thad Robosson
Star: 52 Orionis 
Date & Time: 12-30-99,  3:00 to 6:30 UT (12-31-99 UT) 
Seeing: 4-5   <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)> 
Location of Site:  Carbondale, IL, USA 
Site Classification: Suburban/near rural 
Sky darkness: 4.7 using "stars counted in the area of" method, (Taurus)   <Limiting magnitude> 
Telescope: 8" f/6 Newt on Dob mount  (soon to be split ring  :-) 
Magnification: 87x, 174x 

 

87x was elongated, but not notched.  174x showed definite sep. 
both pure white. 
 
 
 
 

 


 
Randall Heckman
Star: 52 Orionis 
Date & Time: 12/31/99 AT 2:10 UT 
Seeing: 5 
Location of Site: Heckman Observatory 
40 37' 10" N and 99 03' 50" W 
Site Classification:  Rural 
Sky Darkness (Limiting Magnitude):  5.5 
Telescope:  8" Orion Dob 8" with 6" aperture mask 
Magnification: 160x 
Separation (Clear or Toughing): Touching 
Magnitude Comment: Equal magnitude 
Color Comment: White 
General Comment: Occassionally the pair would split, but most of the time the pair formed a touching figure eight. 
 
 
 

 


 
Jose Fernandez
Star: 52 Orionis 
Date & Time: 11 Jan 2000, 21h30m UT 
Seeing: 6 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)> 
Location of site: Asturias-Spain. Lat:43º16'N, Lon:6º1'W
Elevation: 800 m (2424 feet) 
Site classification: Rural 
Sky darkness: 5.5 <Limiting magnitude> 
Telescope: Intes 6" MK65 f12
Magnification: 240X (Celestron Ultima 7.5 mm), 281X (Meade 6.4 mm), 360X (Celestron Ultima 5 mm)
At 240X the star is slightly elongated 
At 281X the star is elongated and in moments of good seeing I can see two round Airy disks 
At 360X the pair is clean split. No obvious color noted in the stars 

 


 
Jim Brownfield
Star: 52 Orionis 
Date & Time: 26/01/2000, 6:30 p.m.- 11:30 p.m. EST 
Seeing: 3 – 5 (improving) <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)>.
Location of site: Huntsburg, Ohio, USA
Site classification: Suburban 
Sky darkness: 6 mag., could see ST 855, going to 5th mag. star Rho  <Limiting magnitude>
Other observing conditions:  83% humidity, 16 degrees F. with 12" snow on ground going to 84% humidity, 4 degrees F.
Telescope: 13.1"/F4.5 Dobsonian, with 5" aperture mask for the brighter pairs
Magnification: 140x, 200x
split at 140x with mask, 200x for clearer separation 

 
Tom Teague
Star: 52 Orionis 
Date & Time: 2000 January 25-26, 2145UT
Seeing: 7 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)>.
Location of site: Chester, England (53 11 08N; 02 51 39W)
Site classification: Suburban 
Sky darkness: 4.5 <Limiting magnitude>
Telescope: 63mm Zeiss Telementor refractor
Magnification: x140, x252 
x140, single but poorly defined - suspect elongation SSW/NNE?  x252, definitely very slightly elongated/elliptical in estimated PA 200 degrees.  No colours. 

 
John M. Ryan
Star: 52 Orionis 
Date of Observation: 30/01/00 22:00UT 
Location of Observation: Ciudad Rodrigo, Salamanca, Spain 
40º 36' N, 6º 32'W, Elev. 800 Meters 
Seeing: 7 to 8. Best so far this new year based on the Luis Arguelles method (0 - 10, 10 best)  
Site classification: Urban
Limiting Mag. (naked eye): 5
Instrument: Meade 8"SCT  
Magnification: 167x, 286x
Separation (Clear or Touching):Touching 
Magnitude Comment:Both about equal and mag. 6 in accordance with the data. 
Color Comment:Both components appeared whithe. 
General Comment:This was the hard nut of the night. At both 167X and 286X I was going from a single star to a figure eight (peanut shape). At times I thought I had the split but could not be sure. Have to leave this one doubtful and will have to return to it and use the Barlow. 

 
Orlon Petterson
Star: 52 Orionis 
Date & Time: 22 February, 2000, 10:00-10:45 UTC
Seeing: 8-9 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)> 
Location of site: Christchurch, New Zealand 43 deg S
Site classification: Suburban 
Sky darkness: 5 Mag, with a gibbous moon to the east <Limiting magnitude> 
Telescope: C102 f/10 refractor  
Magnification: 208x
Appears split only at high power of 208x, mostly appears peanut shaped given the seeing not that steady as cloud coming in from the NE, but occasionally splits clearly into 2. 
 
 
 
 
 

 


 
Jay Zimmerman
Star: 52 Orionis 
Date & Time: 03/06/00, 0400 UT 
Seeing: 6 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)> 
Location of Site: Carbondale, IL, USA 
Site classification: Suburban/ near rural 
Temperature: 37°F (2.8°C) 
Sky darkness: 5.9 <Limiting magnitude>t 
Telescope: 94mm, f7 apo 
Magnification: 160x, 192x, 256x, 384x 
 
52 Ori was elongate at 160x, and elongate-to-notched at 192x and 256x. The components were distinct disks, touching but never cleanly separated, at 384x. Colors: A = B = white. The sky tonight was highly transparent and generally too turbulent to work efficiently at high powers. 

Star images were agitated and smeared except for very brief periods of calm. I made the observations of 52 during very brief moments of steady sky. If the separation of 52 Ori is really 1.2 arc seconds, as advertised, it is almost exactly at the Dawes Limit of my optics. I have the distinct impression that under better conditions (seeing 8 or 9) my glassware might be able to cleanly split 52. Dream on. 
 
 
 
 

 


 
G.E.O.D.A Group
Star: 52 Orionis 
Date & Time: 11-III-2000, 18.30-21.30 UT 
Seeing: 7 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)> 
Location of Site: Manises, Valencia, Spain. GPS coordinates: 39º 29' 36" N, 00º 27' 56" W. 
Site Classification: Urban-Suburban 
Sky darkness: 3 <Limiting magnitude> 
Telescope: Meade 10" LX-200 SCT 
Magnification: 200x 
Published measures are the mean of two observations made from two different observers. 

d = 2.2; PA = 223 
 
 

 


 
Bill Reinehr
Star: 52 Orionis 
Date & Time:  July 20, 2000 04:30 UTC 
Seeing: 7+ <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)>
Location of site: Pflugerville, Texas, USA  (30 degrees N.)
Site classification: Suburban 
Sky darkness: 4.0 <Limiting magnitude> 
Temperature: 79 F. 
Telescope: Vixen 80mm Fluorite, f/8  on Custom D altaz mount  
Magnification: 71x (9mm Vixen Lan)
 
Very cleanly split but the companion was quite faint. 
 
 
 
 
 

 


 
William L. Schart
Star: 52 Orionis 
Date & Time
Seeing: 6 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)> 
Location of site: Killeen, TX (Lat 31 N, Elev 600 ft) 
Site classification: Suburban 
Sky darkness: 4 <Limiting magnitude> 
Telescope: Celestar 8” SCT
Magnification: 78x, 120x, 203x 
This one I got as slightly elongated. A yellow color for the pair as a whole. 
 

 


 
Otto Piechowski
Star: 52 Orionis
Date & Time: Sunday, February 25, 2001
8 to 10 pm EST
Seeing: 7 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)>
Location of site: Lexington, Kentucky, USA
Site classification: Suburban 
Sky darkness:  <Limiting magnitude> 
Conditions: Clear, deep sky, still, fairly steady sky
Telescope: 150 mm mak-cass
Magnification: 257X, 360X (7 and 5 mm
orthoscopic eyepieces)
Clearly resolved.  The faintness of the stars (both 6 magnitude) somehow made this system seem smaller and farther away then all the others I looked at.